Gravity Rush Remaster – Review (PS4)

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Welcome to a new review! Today I’ll talk about Gravity Rush, the PS4 remaster from 2015, which is based on the original PS Vita release. Thanks to the release of the sequel in 2017, Gravity Rush 2, I was quite excited to go back to this game and play through it. So let’s see what this reimagined classic from the PS Vita does look like on the PS4.

Hekseville, you land here with no memory, yet the people are already very moody, some even confrontational against you. You just want to help!

The story

Kat is a seemingly normal woman that on one day just wakes up in the city called Hekseville. With her is the cat she quickly names Dusty. The two are on an adventure right from the start, as her first challenge is a gravity storm that quickly takes buildings apart and spawns monters, the so called Nevi. These Nevi will be the main opponents for Kat and Dusty, because of course Kat isn’t just a kind, helpful and brave soul, she also has Dusty by her side to fight. Dusty is not just a normal cat. In its fur the galaxy seems to be mirrored and it gives Kat her famous gravity shifting powers, which she can use to travel around and of course use to form strong attacks by just launching against enemies or using other items as weapons, such as boxes for example. On her way Kat finds many friends and also opponents, which are leading her around the town, which is seperated into 4 main sections. She is not the only shifter it seems, as another woman also appears with the seemingly same abilities. Raven is her name, and while you have to fight her at first, you will slowly develop a nice friendship with her, that will have its own story path for you to follow. Behind most of these things is one being responsible for the trouble, the creator! At least we think this. Kat had lost her memory ever since she just woke up again in Hekseville and the creator seems to be the answer to the solution of who Kat actually is.

Flying in gravity rush is more Buzz Lightyear falling with style-style falling.

Confusing yet charming

The story of Gravity Rush overall is divided into several parts, which align with the multiple parts of Hekseville that you slowly unlock to visit. On your way, you as Kat can do lots of smaller quests which bring you in contact with all sorts of people from the town. Sometimes you are the maid of a rich woman, sometimes you are the active fighter in the military, trying to restrict the forces of the Nevi. It has no real strict story arc, but rather multiple strings of stories that Gravity Rush picks up to follow it for some time and then to drop it in favor for another storyline. It’s like everyday in Hekseville you wonder what adventure comes next. I actually don’t mind the rather mixed stories and their conclusions, yet it is up to me how and when I want to finish them over the time the game plays out.

Sometimes you’ll get visit from a stranger, called the creator, that pull you into foreign dream lands like this one.

Action/Adventure with top combat

As you do when you’re a gravity shifter, top and bottom are seemingly reversible, exchangeable descriptions. Dusty gives Kat the opportunity to direct her body into the direction we as the player put her against, by selection this with the control sticks of the controller. With that, flying is one of the many ways we can traverse throughout Hekseville. But Kat’s abilities go far beyond of only shifting her pull of gravity. Kat herself is a tremendous fighter, kicking enemies right and left and also developing her very special skills and attacks with the power that Dusty grands her. With that, the collectible run starts, as purple gems are spread all over the town and you can collect and use them to unlock and enhance your abilities. Those abilities are passive, like the amount of time you can shift through the air before you have to pause and stop using the change, or active abilities like a charged attack to finish off a group of enemies. It’s a lot that you can do and collect and I personally had great fun in just flying around as Kat simply getting more gems in order to be stronger for the next opponents to come.

Hekseville is actually quite nice when you take your time to hold in for a second.

Minor improvements I’d love to see

While Gravity Rush is clearly a fantastic port from the PS Vita to the PS4, I wondered whether it would have been possible for the devs to get in more cutscenes? Most dialogue is happening in Max Pain like comic sequences I sure can understand are fancy and stylistic, but on the other hand I’d also would have loved to see them played out instead. This is not a point that hurts the game, it’s just what I’d rather love to see in the game. As Gravity Rush 2 follows this lead with comic dialogue scenes, I see it also as a stylistic choice and don’t think less of the game for it. What instead bothered me more was the length some of those gameplay sections took. Especially outside of Hekseville, like the Ark scenes, were from the pacing and length a bit too long for my tastes. The joy of new sceneries quickly drop when they play out for too long. It simple gets boring over time. Again, not really a big problem, but still something that had me checking my smartphone more than often just to see if anything happened in the world.

A nevi boss, which can only be beaten by hitting those glowing red glass eyes.

Conclusion

Besides the minor points I made in the previous part, I am absolutely stunned by the overall aesthetics of Gravity Rush. Kat as a personality is so charming and brightening everyone’s mood. It’s a joy to see her being involved with the world around her and in regards of who she actually is and what she did, as you’ll learn in the game, it makes a lot of sense that she is the way she is. The flying part and combat of Gravity Rush are something that I had to get used to at first, but I quickly adapted and liked quite a lot how the game played and felt like.